Posts Tagged ‘workout’

4 Tips for Your Outdoor Workout

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

We all know as soon as the weather is no longer below freezing you will start to see people running outside all bundled up. As the spring and summer months approach everyone seems to be out versus being in the gym. It’s important to protect yourself all year round if you plan to be getting your sweat on outdoors!

  1. Eat Something

No matter if you workout first thing in the morning or after work it should not be on an empty stomach. Food is our fuel and if we do not have anything in our system then we are going to fatigue quickly and not be at our full potential. It can be a simple protein shake, RX bar, banana, or even a healthy nut mix. Something that can be taken easily around wherever you go.  If people push themselves too much they can become dizzy and even faint. It does not matter if the weather is 90 degrees out with sun or 53 degrees and overcast. Food is your friend!!

  1. Sunscreen

According to the American Cancer Society, “Melanoma accounts for only about 1% of skin cancers but causes a large majority of skin cancer deaths. The American Cancer Society’s estimates for melanoma in the United States for 2018 are: about 91,270 new melanomas will be diagnosed (about 55,150 in men and 36,120 in women) and about 9,320 people are expected to die of melanoma  (about 5,990 men and 3,330 women). The rates of melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years.”*

This is crazy!! But think about it. Do you put sunscreen on every day? Not just on your face but on your arms? Probably not. They have so many products available for facial sunscreen as well as body sunscreen that it should be part of you daily routine. Many moisturizers now have SPF 30 or more in their products. Again even in the dead of winter it is still advised to wear sunscreen against the sun’s UV rays.

  1. Hydration

On a good day people should be drinking half of their body weight in ounces of water. Half!! So now imagine exercising and all that work your body is doing. Your body needs to be replenished. I have seen some runners wear a running belt with small bottles of water on their backs. My husband likes to hold a small bottle that fits into his hand like a glove. When people go on hikes there are signs everywhere that say if you need to turn around once half of your water is gone. Not sure how much water you have had for the day? Easy! Use a reusable container such as a Blender Bottle because on the outside there are marks displaying the ounces. The normal size is 24 ounces. Fill that all the way to the top. Actually finish the whole thing before you fill up so you know for sure how much you have had. If you weight 100 lbs then everyday water intake should be 50 ounces. It is hard to get used to drinking all that water but your body will start to crave it after awhile. You and the bathroom will be best friends in the beginning but you will notice a change in energy, and how you generally overall feel with just drinking water.  Don’t forget on a hot day you may not be sweating due to the moisture evaporating off your body, this is the most important time to continue hydrating!

  1. Wearing an ID Bracelet

In 2016 there were over 6,000 reported accidents of pedestrians getting hit by vehicles. That was a 11% jump from previous years. This is crazy! If you are running or biking out by yourself and if you do not have ID on you, what happens if you are in an accident? Get a rode ID. I thought my husband was being too cautious with wearing his everywhere but when I almost got hit by a car while on a run I changed my tune. If you are going somewhere by yourself it is advised to at least tell someone where you are going in case of an emergency. Let them know the time you think you will done and let them know when your workout is completed. There have been plenty of stories of people going missing and no one knew they were even

What is on the Road ID?

Your name, the town and state you live in, three emergency contacts with their relation to you. Also if you have any allergies. If you wear a running belt or you have bag on your bike you can always put a state Id in there but hopefully if people are helping you they will think to look in the those places. Check out roadid.com to see if one will work for you.

 

With these quick tips you should be able to have a great and safe workout all year round. If you have any questions and would like to sit down for a FREE consultation with one of our doctors just give us a call at 847-362-4476 today! Mention this blog to get your own **FREE BLENDER BOTTLE to keep track of your daily water intake. Enjoy!

**While Supplies Last

*Cancer.org

 

Pelvic Bridge Vs. Pelvic Tilt

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

When a person comes into the office as either a new patient or as a wellness visit, I usually ask if they perform any type of exercise at home. Some answer no because they are too busy or do not have the equipment at home. Others will say that they go to the gym and the rest will say they try and work on exercising at home. My next question is if they know what a pelvic tilt is. If the person takes a yoga class or has had some sort of physical therapy in the past this is familiar to them. Some will go into a bridge position and rest give me a blank stare. This lead me to start thinking how many people are doing a bridge instead of a pelvic tilt.

 

So what is a pelvic tilt? A pelvic tilt is an exercise comprised of very subtle spinal movements that strengthen the support muscles around the low back, particularly the abdominals. They are a good preliminary exercise for those seeking low back pain relief or to help improve your posture. They can be done lying on the floor or standing with the back to a wall. For performing them on your back, lie on your back with the knees bent and the soles of the feet on the floor. This is your Neutral Spine* with the natural curve of the lumbar spine causing the low back to be slightly elevated from the floor. On an exhale, gently rock your hips towards your face. Your butt will not actually leave the floor, but you will feel your low back press into the floor. You are essentially taking the curve out of the low back. Think of the pelvis as a bowl of water. When you do the pelvic tilt, the water would be spilling towards your belly. After a few seconds, inhale and return to your neutral position. Repeat this movement 5 to 20 times.

 

When working on pelvic tilts you are trying to achieve a *neutral spine. Neutral spine is the natural position of the spine when all 3 curves of the spine; cervical (neck), thoracic (middle) and lumbar (lower) are present and in good alignment. This is the strongest position for the spine when we are standing or sitting.

                      

Pelvic Tilt

Pelvic tilts are a basic exercise that needs to be mastered before challenging yourself with harder exercises. If keeping a pelvic tilt is difficult then performing harder exercises will cause discomfort and maybe even pain in the low back area. There is no rush into progressing with exercises. If a patient has acute low back pain, pelvic tilts are great for relieving tension in the back. Bridges would come later into the rehab protocol once the pelvic tilts technique is acquired.

 

 

Pelvic Bridge

A pelvic bridge is a great exercise that works on glutes, hamstrings, core muscles such as rectus abdominis and erector spinae. Bridges can be modified to increase the level of difficulty by adding a swiss ball, Bosu ball, single leg movement and other variations. At the beginning of a rehab routine we usually wait to perform any type of bridging for low back patients due to the possibility of the low back not responding well due to poor core strength. By going into a bridge, it is putting your back into extension and patients that come in with low back issues have a hard time with extension. Before going into a bridge I always make sure that the body is in a pelvic tilt so there is no extra tension in the low back. Lie face up on the floor, with your knees bent and feet flat on the ground. Keep your arms at your side with your palms down or up. Lift your hips off the ground until your knees, hips and shoulders form a straight line. Squeeze those glutes hard and keep your abs drawn in so you do not overextend your back during the exercise. Hold for three to five seconds and then bring your hips back down to the floor. Repeat for two sets of ten reps. After a few days of trying bridges and there are no residual effects then we will progress with the exercise.

                        

If you would like to learn more about performing pelvic tilts and bridges, please call the office for a FREE CONSULTATION at 847-362-4476 with Dr. Jordan or Dr. Jade to see how we can help you!!

Oh Cramp! I Got a Spasm!

by Kaity Mclenithan, ATC

Differences Between Muscles Cramps, Spasms, and Soreness

Who has ever woken up in the middle of the night with the dreaded charlie horse cramp in their calf?? We have all heard about it but have you ever wondered why it happens? Listed below are the differences between a muscle cramp, muscle spasm and muscle soreness and how to help deal with and prevent them.

A muscle cramp is an involuntary muscle contraction. Meaning that the muscles fires without your control, and usually lasts for a short period of time.  There are many possible causes for muscles cramps such as: dehydration, electrolyte loss/imbalance, loss of sodium, low levels of magnesium, muscle fatigue, and lack of oxygen.

A muscle spasm is a reflex to something else that is going on in the body or trauma. There are two types of spasms that can take place: clonic and tonic. Clonic is an involuntary contraction that alternates between contraction and relaxation. Tonic is a hard, constant muscle contraction that lasts for a span of time. Muscle spasms can also cause muscle strains.

Muscle soreness is pain caused by overexertion from physical activity. This most commonly happens when people try something new in their exercise routine/new activity or try a new class.  Unfortunately, the older people get the more often this tends to happen. There are two types of soreness acute and delayed-onset.

Acute muscle soreness happens when the muscle is fatigued.  This can happen during or directly after exercise. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs 24 to 48 hours after exercise, and usually subsides 3-4 days later.  DOMS can be characterized by increased muscle tension, stiffness and the muscle being resistant to stretching. Possible causes of this can be small tears in the muscle and disruption of the connective tissue of muscle tendon fibers.

 

How To Prevent DOMS

  1. Start with an exercise routine of moderate activity and intensity, and then gradually increasing activity and intensity.
  2. Stay Hydrated. It is imperative to drink water throughout the day, and not just pre and post workout.  Your body will thank you.
  3. Be consistent with your stretching, foam rolling and lacrosse ball.  These increase blood flow to your muscles, decrease knots and trigger points and help prevent lactic acid build up.
  4. Add Branch Chain Amino Acids during and after your workout.  BCAA’s are great to add to your water bottle to improve athletic performance, aid in muscle recovery as well as help preserve lean muscle mass.
  5. Supplement with Magnesium.  Magnesium will help with leg cramps as well as soreness.

 

Making sure you are not depleted in certain minerals such as magnesium and potassium is important as mentioned above. Even with all of the foods we consume throughout the day we still may need a little help. Magnesium helps to relax the muscles and decrease the risk of them cramping as well as other health benefits including relieving constipation! If the muscle seems to not want to relax then you may find other techniques such as massage therapy or graston therapy may help.

If you are having muscle issues and is not sure what can be done, call the office for your FREE consultation at 847-362-4476. Mention this blog to receive 15% off a foam roller or Tiger Tail and also 20% off our magnesium or BCAA supplement today!

Protein Shakes

by Dr. Jade Dellinger

I
run into clients that are not regularly eating breakfast. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day! Just like most of you my schedule is hectic and limited. At least two days a week I’m out of the house by 6 am and do not return before 8pm. It’s imperative that I start with a healthy breakfast so keep me going on those 14 hour days. I often start the other 5 days with a 60-90 minute workout heavy on weight lifting. So how do I do it? How do I have time to make such a complete breakfast? What do I eat before/during/after workouts?  I often get asked by clients and friends alike what goes into my protein shake. So here are the answers.

Base: I keep it simple and easy and start with water. Depending on the amount of frozen ingredients I’ll use between 4-6 oz of filtered water. If I’m making the shake for my husband or company I’ll sometimes substitute some of the water for coconut or almond milk – just to mix it up a bit.

Veggies: I like frozen broccoli, kale and spinach as my go to. Honestly, you can throw almost anything into your shake (if you have a vitamix like we do) and it will blend fully and silently make your shake crazy healthy. If you have veggies from last night’s dinner leftovers or ones that are about to turn bad throw them in as well!

Fruit: Don’t get carried away here. I will add 1/4 of a cup of frozen blueberries and 1/2 a banana at most to my shakes. If I’ve made a salad the night before and only used 1/2 an apple I might throw that it. I try not to add too much sugar here, so limit the amount of fruit you’re adding.

Supplements: Here’s where it should be more personalized. For our shakes I use the following:

  • Pro-Active Power Greens: a powdered greens product loaded with energizing phyto-nutrients, certified organic wholefoods and plant extracts, including pure spirulina, chlorella, certified organic goji, certified organic banana, broccoli and cauliflower.
  • Pro-Active Probiotic Complete: hypoallergenic blend of 12 certified probiotic species offers the most complete spectrum of microorganisms for individuals seeking higher amounts of several types of probiotics.
  • Omega Superb: contains a stable combination of EPA and DHA as well as astaxanthin for added antioxidant support.
  • Immucare II: Immucare II® supports key systems in the body responsible for maintaining a healthy immune system, including the liver, digestive tract, endocrine glands and spleen.
  • Botanical Treasures: delivers broad spectrum antioxidant activity to quench free radicals, thereby normalizing gene behavior and supporting healthy aging.
  • Colostrum: Increases energy and stamina, lean muscle mass, activates fat metabolism, and returns our body to vibrant health.

Protein: I vary my protein intake between whey and vegan products. They both have their individual benefits so if you’re not opposed to animal protein sources I highly recommend having both on hand and alternating them each day.

When making your shake be sure to add the protein last and make sure everything is well blended prior to adding the protein in as to not alter the structure of your protein powder by blending it up too much.

Keep watching our other blog posts for what to look for when choosing a protein powder, why probiotics are beneficial and all the different uses for colostrum!