Posts Tagged ‘rehab’

12 Days of Christmas Sale

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

 

Check back everyday on Facebook or Instagram for the latest deals!!

Black Friday Sale

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

Visit us on November 29th at 9:00 am thru 6:00 pm on Facebook or Instagram to see what specials are going on at NSPAH!!

National Rehabilitation Week Sale

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

All week we are celebrating all things rehab!!

National Rehabilitation Awareness Week is a time to acknowledge the many benefits that can arise from rehab programs. It highlights the positive impact that these services make in the lives of people in need. This week recognizes that every person deserves to live his/her life to the fullest.
What does that mean for you??
All of our rehab equipment is 30% off!
From foam rollers, SI belt, swiss balls, hand therapy, Stretch out Strap and more!!

While supplies last!

Christmas In July

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

 

Happy July everyone!! From now until the end of July at the office we will be having the chance for you to win special treats!! From 10% off supplements, rehab equipment, discounts off cupping to the ultimate prize. One lucky present contains a FREE 60 minute massage! Once that gift is picked that present is gone.

Every time you have an appointment at the office you can chose from our presents. The more appointments you have the more chances to win and save!

Good luck everyone!!⁣

Easter Basket Surprise

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

Hoppy April everyone!! From now until Easter Sunday at the office we will be having the chance for you to win special treats!! From 10% off supplements, rehab equipment, discounts off cupping to the ultimate prize. One lucky egg contains a FREE 60 minute massage! Once that egg is picked that egg is gone.

Every time you have an appointment at the office you can chose from our basket of eggs. The more appointments you have the more chances to win and save!

Good luck everyone!!⁣

12 Days of Christmas Sale

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

It’s that time of year again!

Starting December 6th until December 21st there will be new sales. Check them out on Facebook and Instagram!

Kidz Stretch Class

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

Have you ever thought, “If I knew then what I know now about stretching I would be in better shape!!”

Well now here is that opportunity for you and your kids to workout together! Join our Athletic Trainer Kristin on August 24th for this interactive workshop. This one hour class can work with children ages 5 to 13. It is highly encouraged that the parent/guardian participate as well so these helpful habits can continue at home. There are only 5 spots available and the cost of the ticket is for the child and parent/guardian as well as the Stretch Out Strap that will be used in class. When you come to the workshop you will be learning a variety of stretches. Bring comfortable clothes since we will be performing the stretches in class as well as a great attitude to learn!

Muscle of the Month: Pec Major & Minor

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

When people want to start exercising more, one of the first muscles they want to work on is their chest. Most people have heard of large muscle pectoralis major but seem to forget about pectoralis minor. Both need to work together in order to function at their highest capacity.

The pectoralis major muscle is a large muscle in the upper chest, fanning across the chest from the shoulder to the breastbone. The two pectoralis major muscles, commonly referred to as the “pecs,” are the muscles that create the bulk of the chest. The pectorals are predominantly used to control the movement of the arm and also play a part in deep inhalation, pulling the ribcage to create room for the lungs to expand. Six separate sets of muscle fibers are identified within the pectoralis major muscle. This enables each portion of the pectoralis major muscle to be moved separately by the nervous system.

The pectoralis minor is a thin, flat muscle found immediately underneath the pectoralis major. This is the smaller of the two pectoral muscles, or muscles of the chest. This muscle extends from three origins on the third, fourth, and fifth ribs on each side of the ribcage to the coracoid process (a small, hook-like structure) of the scapula, or shoulder blade.

The following events listed below can aggravate the Pec Major:

  • Unusual postures like head leaned forward for a long time, shoulders deliberately pushed forward, sunken-chest posture
  • Sitting in front of computer or working at a stretch on a desk may cause distorted postures
  • Sudden jerks during weight lifting with the arms out in front of the body
  • Already fatigued muscles if further used for heavy jobs may lead to simple to severe pain in the muscles.
  • Intensive anxiety over a long period of time or recurring panic attacks

The following events listed below can aggravate the Pec Minor:

  • Trauma to the chest caused by a car accident, such as whiplash
  • Major or minor fracture or strain of the upper ribs.
  • Use of crutches for a long time
  • Hyperventilation or heavy breathing
  • Mental stress for a long time
  • Carrying heavy backpack or similar things over a period of time.
  • Keeping the head forward for a long time, and sunken-chest posture that are common in people who work on computers for longer periods
  • Previous or irregular cardiac pain from a heart attack or angina pectoris

Here are some common symptoms for Pec Major and Pec Minor:

  • Pectoralis major pain may occur in the form of chest pain, shoulder pain particularly frontal part, and pain in the inside of arm to the elbow. This pain may sometimes be confused as cardiac pain which can be confirmed by medical experts
  • Impaired lymphatic drainage may cause the breast to enlarge
  • Pain may spread into the ring finger and little finger of the hand for pec major
  • A pain in between the shoulder blade may occur simultaneously
  • Pain may be felt while stretching the hands on two sides
  • Severe pain may cause a feeling of constriction in the chest which much resembles to that of angina pectoris
  • Pain may be irregular which is felt while actively using the upper arms
  • Pain may be one-sided initially, but if not treated may spread to the other side of the chest
  • A feeling of pain coming from the inside part of the elbow that is often confused with the pain of “golfer’s elbow” or medial epicondylitis may be a symptom of pec minor
  • Pain that is originating in the inside of the arm and extending up to the middle, ring and little finger may be a symptom of pec minor as well as numbness in the hand and forearm
  • Difficulty in stretching the arm forward and up may be painful

*If you think you are having chest pain and is not sure if it is muscle related or if you are having a heart attack please go to emergency room and/or check in with your medical doctor

If your symptoms are related more to pec major or pec minor here are some things to do.

  • Rest would be very important since these muscle do so much work
  • Icing the area a few times a day for 15-20 minutes at each session
  • Some sort of anti-inflammatory to control the inflammation
  • Treatment at our office would be with Low Level Light Therapy, chiropractic adjustments, physical therapy for stretching and to start implementing an exercises routine. Massage therapy to try and relax the tight and aggravated muscles. As well as a posture program to make sure the correct muscles are working properly

Mention this blog to receive your New Patient exam for only $55!! Call today at 847-362-4476

The Trapezius : Muscle of the Month

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

The trapezius is one of the major muscles of the back and is responsible for moving, rotating, and stabilizing the scapula (shoulder blade) and extending the head at the neck. It is a wide, flat, superficial muscle that covers most of the upper back and the posterior of the neck. Like most other muscles, there are two trapezius muscles – a left and a right trapezius – that are symmetrical and meet at the vertebral column

The trapezius starts at the occipital bone and the spinous processes of the cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Then extends across the neck and back to insert via tendons on the clavicle, acromion, and spine of the scapula. The name trapezius is given to this muscle due to its roughly trapezoidal shape. The trapezius can be divided into three bands of muscle fibers that have distinct structures and functions within the muscle:

Upper Trapezius, Middle Trapezius and Lower Trapezius

 Upper Trapezius

This portion helps with elevating (shrugging) the scapula or by bracing the shoulder when weight is carried; ie purses, grocery bags, backpacks, laptop bags. The action of this muscle also helps to extend the neck. Symptoms of having issues with the upper trapezius muscle are; headaches, facial/temple/jaw pain, pain behind the eye, dizziness, stiffness and limited range of motion

Middle Trapezius

These muscle fibers help to retract and adduct the scapula by pulling the shoulder blade closer to the spine. Symptoms can be mid back pain, headaches at the base of the sku
ll, a “burning” sensation that is close to the spine, and pain referring to the shoulder

Lower Trapezius

The inferior fibers depress the scapula by pulling it closer to the lower part of the thoracic vertebrae. To rotate the scapula, the lower and upper fibers work together to  rotate the shoulder blade upward. All three sections help to stabilize the shoulder blade to prevent irrelevant movement. Symptoms can be mid-back, neck, and/or upper shoulder region pain, possibly referral pain on the back of the shoulder blade, down the inside of the arm, and into the ring and little fingers, a deep ache and tenderness over the top of the shoulder

 

Causes of Trapezius Symptoms

  • a purse or daypack that is too heavy and on just one shoulder
  • fatigue
  • tensing your shoulders
  • cradling a phone between your ear and shoulder
  • a chair without armrests, or the armrests are too high
  • typing with a keyboard too high
  • sleeping on your front or back with your head rotated to the side for a long period
  • sitting without a firm back support (sitting slumped)
  • Backpacking, bike riding
  • any profession or activity that requires you to bend over for extended periods
  • large breasts and not wearing a supportive bra
  • whiplash (a car accident, falling on your head, or any sudden jerk of the head)
  • head-forward posture
  • turning your head to one side for long periods to have a conversation
  • tight pectoralis major muscles

 

Treatment

Treatment to help reduce the pain in any of these three sections of the trapezius is thru physical therapy to increase range of motion and to help strengthen the neck. Also thru chiropractic care to make sure there are no subluxations and that the body is in proper alignment. Massage therapy will help relax the muscles from spasming and also using Low Level Light Therapy (Cold Laser) to reduce any inflammation that is being caused in the body.

If you are not sure if you are experiencing any of these symptoms mentioned above and is not sure what to do we are offering a free consultation with one of our doctors to see if we can help. Please call the office at 847-362-4476 so we can help you to start feeling better today!

Athletic Trainers vs. Personal Trainers

by Kaity Mclenithan, ATC

We often get questions regarding what exactly is an athletic trainer, and how they differ from a personal trainer or a physical therapist.  We have two Certified Athletic Trainers at our office that perform your daily rehab exercises including, but not limited to manual therapy, graston therapy and exercises.  Below we have broken down information regarding an Athletic Trainer vs. a Personal Trainer.

ATHLETIC TRAINER

An athletic trainer is an expert at recognizing, treating and preventing musculoskeletal injuries. ATs meets qualifications set by the Board of Certification, Inc., and adhere to the requirements of a state licensing board. ATs practice under the direction of a physician and are members of a health care profession recognized by the American Medical Association.

Requirements:

  • Must obtain, at minimum, a bachelor’s degree in athletic training
  • Must pass a comprehensive exam to earn the ATC credential
  • Must keep their knowledge and skills current by participating in continuing education
  • Must adhere to standards of professional practice set by one national certifying agency and to a national code of ethics

Daily Duties:

– Provide physical medicine and rehabilitation services

– Prevent, diagnose, treat and rehabilitate injuries (acute and chronic)

– Coordinate care with physicians and other health-care professionals

– Work in schools, colleges, professional sports, clinics, hospitals, corporations, industry, military, performing arts

PERSONAL TRAINER

A personal trainer develops, monitors and changes an individual’s specific exercise program in a fitness or sports setting; some personal trainers also make nutrition recommendations. Personal trainers can earn credentials through a number of agencies and can work as fitness trainers without formal instruction or certification.

Requirements:

  • May or may not have higher education in health sciences
  • May or may not be required to obtain certification or state licensing
  • May or may not participate in continuing education
  • May become certified by any one of numerous organizations that set varying education and practice requirements

Daily Duties:

– Assess fitness needs and design appropriate exercise regimens

– Work with clients to achieve fitness goals

– Help educate the public on the importance of physical activity

– Work in health clubs, wellness centers and other locations where fitness activities take place

Athletic trainers and personal trainers are both necessary in their own ways.  We refer to personal trainers to take our patients to the next level once they have successfully graduated from rehabilitative care.

If you have any questions regarding athletic training, or are looking for a referral to a trusted personal trainer do not hesitate to contact us!

 

http://www.nata.org/sites/default/files/AT-Not-Trainer.pdf