Posts Tagged ‘hydration’

4 Tips for Your Outdoor Workout

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

We all know as soon as the weather is no longer below freezing you will start to see people running outside all bundled up. As the spring and summer months approach everyone seems to be out versus being in the gym. It’s important to protect yourself all year round if you plan to be getting your sweat on outdoors!

  1. Eat Something

No matter if you workout first thing in the morning or after work it should not be on an empty stomach. Food is our fuel and if we do not have anything in our system then we are going to fatigue quickly and not be at our full potential. It can be a simple protein shake, RX bar, banana, or even a healthy nut mix. Something that can be taken easily around wherever you go.  If people push themselves too much they can become dizzy and even faint. It does not matter if the weather is 90 degrees out with sun or 53 degrees and overcast. Food is your friend!!

  1. Sunscreen

According to the American Cancer Society, “Melanoma accounts for only about 1% of skin cancers but causes a large majority of skin cancer deaths. The American Cancer Society’s estimates for melanoma in the United States for 2018 are: about 91,270 new melanomas will be diagnosed (about 55,150 in men and 36,120 in women) and about 9,320 people are expected to die of melanoma  (about 5,990 men and 3,330 women). The rates of melanoma have been rising for the last 30 years.”*

This is crazy!! But think about it. Do you put sunscreen on every day? Not just on your face but on your arms? Probably not. They have so many products available for facial sunscreen as well as body sunscreen that it should be part of you daily routine. Many moisturizers now have SPF 30 or more in their products. Again even in the dead of winter it is still advised to wear sunscreen against the sun’s UV rays.

  1. Hydration

On a good day people should be drinking half of their body weight in ounces of water. Half!! So now imagine exercising and all that work your body is doing. Your body needs to be replenished. I have seen some runners wear a running belt with small bottles of water on their backs. My husband likes to hold a small bottle that fits into his hand like a glove. When people go on hikes there are signs everywhere that say if you need to turn around once half of your water is gone. Not sure how much water you have had for the day? Easy! Use a reusable container such as a Blender Bottle because on the outside there are marks displaying the ounces. The normal size is 24 ounces. Fill that all the way to the top. Actually finish the whole thing before you fill up so you know for sure how much you have had. If you weight 100 lbs then everyday water intake should be 50 ounces. It is hard to get used to drinking all that water but your body will start to crave it after awhile. You and the bathroom will be best friends in the beginning but you will notice a change in energy, and how you generally overall feel with just drinking water.  Don’t forget on a hot day you may not be sweating due to the moisture evaporating off your body, this is the most important time to continue hydrating!

  1. Wearing an ID Bracelet

In 2016 there were over 6,000 reported accidents of pedestrians getting hit by vehicles. That was a 11% jump from previous years. This is crazy! If you are running or biking out by yourself and if you do not have ID on you, what happens if you are in an accident? Get a rode ID. I thought my husband was being too cautious with wearing his everywhere but when I almost got hit by a car while on a run I changed my tune. If you are going somewhere by yourself it is advised to at least tell someone where you are going in case of an emergency. Let them know the time you think you will done and let them know when your workout is completed. There have been plenty of stories of people going missing and no one knew they were even

What is on the Road ID?

Your name, the town and state you live in, three emergency contacts with their relation to you. Also if you have any allergies. If you wear a running belt or you have bag on your bike you can always put a state Id in there but hopefully if people are helping you they will think to look in the those places. Check out roadid.com to see if one will work for you.

 

With these quick tips you should be able to have a great and safe workout all year round. If you have any questions and would like to sit down for a FREE consultation with one of our doctors just give us a call at 847-362-4476 today! Mention this blog to get your own **FREE BLENDER BOTTLE to keep track of your daily water intake. Enjoy!

**While Supplies Last

*Cancer.org

 

Hydropeptide Sale: BOGO 50% off

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

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Heat Exhaustion vs. Heat Stroke

by Dr. Jade Dellinger

What causes heat exhaustion and heatstroke?

Heat-related illnesses, such as heat exhaustion and heatstroke, occur when your body can’t keep itself cool. As the air temperature rises, your body stays cool when your sweat evaporates. On hot, humid days, the evaporation of sweat is slowed by the increased moisture in the air. When sweating isn’t enough to cool your body, your body temperature rises, and you may become ill.

What is heat exhaustion?

Heat exhaustion happens when your body gets too hot. It can be caused by physical exercise or hot weather. You may experience:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Feeling weak and/or confused
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Dark-colored urine, which indicates dehydration

What should I do if I think I have heat exhaustion?

If you think you have heat exhaustion, get out of the heat quickly. Rest in a building that has air-conditioning. If you can’t get inside, find a cool, shady place. Drink plenty of water or other fluids. Do NOT drink alcohol or caffeinated drinks (such as soda). These can make heat exhaustion worse. Take a cool shower or bath, or apply cool water to your skin. Take off any tight or unnecessary clothing. If you do not feel better within 30 minutes, you should contact your doctor. If heat exhaustion is not treated, it can progress to heatstroke.

What is heatstroke?

Heatstroke is when the internal temperature of the body reaches 104°F. It can happen when your body gets too hot during strenuous exercise or when exposed to very hot temperatures, or it can happen after heat exhaustion isn’t properly treated. Heatstroke is much more serious than heat exhaustion. Heatstroke can cause damage to your organs and brain. In extreme cases, it can kill you.

Symptoms of heatstroke

  • High fever (104°F or higher)
  • Severe headache
  • Dizziness and feeling light-headed
  • A flushed or red appearance to the skin
  • Lack of sweating
  • Muscle weakness or cramps
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Fast breathing
  • Feeling confused, anxious or disoriented
  • Seizures

What should I do if I think someone has heatstroke?

If you think someone might have heatstroke, call emergency medical personnel immediately. While you are waiting for medical assistance, take the person into an air-conditioned building or a cool, shady place. Remove the person’s unnecessary clothing to help cool him or her down. Try to fan air over the person while wetting the skin with water. You can also apply ice packs to the person’s armpits, groin, neck and back. These areas contain a lot of blood vessels close the surface of the skin. Cooling them with ice packs can help the person cool down.

Get medical help right away if you have these warning signs:

  • Skin that feels hot and dry, but not sweaty
  • Confusion or loss of consciousness
  • Frequent vomiting
  • Shortness of breath or trouble breathing

Do medicines affect heatstroke?

The following are some medicines that can put you in danger of heatstroke because they affect the way your body reacts to heat:

  • Allergy medicines (antihistamines)
  • Some blood pressure and heart medicines (beta-blockers and vasoconstrictors)
  • Diet pills and illegal drugs such as cocaine (amphetamines)
  • Laxatives
  • Some medicines that treat mental health conditions (antidepressants and antipsychotics)
  • Seizure medicines (anticonvulsants)
  • Water pills (diuretics)

Tell your doctor what medicines you are taking. He or she can tell you if your medicine puts you in danger of heatstroke.

What does the “heat index” mean?

The heat index tells you how hot it feels outside in the shade. It is not the same as the outside temperature. The heat index is a measurement of how hot it feels when relative humidity is combined with the effects of the air temperature. When you are standing in full sunshine, the heat index value is even higher. A heat index of 90°F or higher is dangerous.

How can I prevent heat illness?

When the heat index is high, stay indoors in air-conditioned areas when possible. If you must go outside, take the following precautions:

  • Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.
  • Protect yourself from the sun by wearing a hat or using an umbrella.
  • Use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or more.
  • Drink plenty of water before starting an outdoor activity. Drink extra water all day. Keep in mind that heat-related illnesses are not only caused by high temperatures and a loss of fluids, but also a lack of salt in the body. Some sports drinks can help replenish the salt in your body lost through sweating.
  • Drink fewer beverages that contain caffeine (such as tea, coffee and soda) or alcohol.
  • Schedule vigorous outdoor activities for cooler times of the day — before 10:00 a.m. and after 6:00 p.m.
  • During an outdoor activity, take frequent breaks. Drink water or other fluids every 15 to 20 minutes, even if you don’t feel thirsty. If you have clear, pale urine, you are probably drinking enough fluids. Dark-colored urine is an indication that you’re dehydrated.
  • If you have a chronic medical problem, ask your doctor about how to deal with the heat, about drinking extra fluids and about your medicines.

What should I do after having heat exhaustion or heatstroke?

Having heat exhaustion or heatstroke makes you more sensitive to hot conditions for about a week afterwards. Be especially careful not to exercise too hard, and avoid hot weather. Your doctor can tell you when it is safe to return to your normal activities.

 

Management of Heatstroke and Heat Exhaustion by JL Glazer, M.D. (American Family Physician June 01, 2005, http://www.aafp.org/afp/20050601/2133.html)

By: Kaity McLenithan, Licensed Athletic Trainer