Archive for the ‘Massage Therapy’ Category

Oh Cramp! I Got a Spasm!

by Kaity Mclenithan, ATC

Differences Between Muscles Cramps, Spasms, and Soreness

Who has ever woken up in the middle of the night with the dreaded charlie horse cramp in their calf?? We have all heard about it but have you ever wondered why it happens? Listed below are the differences between a muscle cramp, muscle spasm and muscle soreness and how to help deal with and prevent them.

A muscle cramp is an involuntary muscle contraction. Meaning that the muscles fires without your control, and usually lasts for a short period of time.  There are many possible causes for muscles cramps such as: dehydration, electrolyte loss/imbalance, loss of sodium, low levels of magnesium, muscle fatigue, and lack of oxygen.

A muscle spasm is a reflex to something else that is going on in the body or trauma. There are two types of spasms that can take place: clonic and tonic. Clonic is an involuntary contraction that alternates between contraction and relaxation. Tonic is a hard, constant muscle contraction that lasts for a span of time. Muscle spasms can also cause muscle strains.

Muscle soreness is pain caused by overexertion from physical activity. This most commonly happens when people try something new in their exercise routine/new activity or try a new class.  Unfortunately, the older people get the more often this tends to happen. There are two types of soreness acute and delayed-onset.

Acute muscle soreness happens when the muscle is fatigued.  This can happen during or directly after exercise. Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) occurs 24 to 48 hours after exercise, and usually subsides 3-4 days later.  DOMS can be characterized by increased muscle tension, stiffness and the muscle being resistant to stretching. Possible causes of this can be small tears in the muscle and disruption of the connective tissue of muscle tendon fibers.

 

How To Prevent DOMS

  1. Start with an exercise routine of moderate activity and intensity, and then gradually increasing activity and intensity.
  2. Stay Hydrated. It is imperative to drink water throughout the day, and not just pre and post workout.  Your body will thank you.
  3. Be consistent with your stretching, foam rolling and lacrosse ball.  These increase blood flow to your muscles, decrease knots and trigger points and help prevent lactic acid build up.
  4. Add Branch Chain Amino Acids during and after your workout.  BCAA’s are great to add to your water bottle to improve athletic performance, aid in muscle recovery as well as help preserve lean muscle mass.
  5. Supplement with Magnesium.  Magnesium will help with leg cramps as well as soreness.

 

Making sure you are not depleted in certain minerals such as magnesium and potassium is important as mentioned above. Even with all of the foods we consume throughout the day we still may need a little help. Magnesium helps to relax the muscles and decrease the risk of them cramping as well as other health benefits including relieving constipation! If the muscle seems to not want to relax then you may find other techniques such as massage therapy or graston therapy may help.

If you are having muscle issues and is not sure what can be done, call the office for your FREE consultation at 847-362-4476. Mention this blog to receive 15% off a foam roller or Tiger Tail and also 20% off our magnesium or BCAA supplement today!

Muscle of the Month: Pec Major & Minor

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

When people want to start exercising more, one of the first muscles they want to work on is their chest. Most people have heard of large muscle pectoralis major but seem to forget about pectoralis minor. Both need to work together in order to function at their highest capacity.

The pectoralis major muscle is a large muscle in the upper chest, fanning across the chest from the shoulder to the breastbone. The two pectoralis major muscles, commonly referred to as the “pecs,” are the muscles that create the bulk of the chest. The pectorals are predominantly used to control the movement of the arm and also play a part in deep inhalation, pulling the ribcage to create room for the lungs to expand. Six separate sets of muscle fibers are identified within the pectoralis major muscle. This enables each portion of the pectoralis major muscle to be moved separately by the nervous system.

The pectoralis minor is a thin, flat muscle found immediately underneath the pectoralis major. This is the smaller of the two pectoral muscles, or muscles of the chest. This muscle extends from three origins on the third, fourth, and fifth ribs on each side of the ribcage to the coracoid process (a small, hook-like structure) of the scapula, or shoulder blade.

The following events listed below can aggravate the Pec Major:

  • Unusual postures like head leaned forward for a long time, shoulders deliberately pushed forward, sunken-chest posture
  • Sitting in front of computer or working at a stretch on a desk may cause distorted postures
  • Sudden jerks during weight lifting with the arms out in front of the body
  • Already fatigued muscles if further used for heavy jobs may lead to simple to severe pain in the muscles.
  • Intensive anxiety over a long period of time or recurring panic attacks

The following events listed below can aggravate the Pec Minor:

  • Trauma to the chest caused by a car accident, such as whiplash
  • Major or minor fracture or strain of the upper ribs.
  • Use of crutches for a long time
  • Hyperventilation or heavy breathing
  • Mental stress for a long time
  • Carrying heavy backpack or similar things over a period of time.
  • Keeping the head forward for a long time, and sunken-chest posture that are common in people who work on computers for longer periods
  • Previous or irregular cardiac pain from a heart attack or angina pectoris

Here are some common symptoms for Pec Major and Pec Minor:

  • Pectoralis major pain may occur in the form of chest pain, shoulder pain particularly frontal part, and pain in the inside of arm to the elbow. This pain may sometimes be confused as cardiac pain which can be confirmed by medical experts
  • Impaired lymphatic drainage may cause the breast to enlarge
  • Pain may spread into the ring finger and little finger of the hand for pec major
  • A pain in between the shoulder blade may occur simultaneously
  • Pain may be felt while stretching the hands on two sides
  • Severe pain may cause a feeling of constriction in the chest which much resembles to that of angina pectoris
  • Pain may be irregular which is felt while actively using the upper arms
  • Pain may be one-sided initially, but if not treated may spread to the other side of the chest
  • A feeling of pain coming from the inside part of the elbow that is often confused with the pain of “golfer’s elbow” or medial epicondylitis may be a symptom of pec minor
  • Pain that is originating in the inside of the arm and extending up to the middle, ring and little finger may be a symptom of pec minor as well as numbness in the hand and forearm
  • Difficulty in stretching the arm forward and up may be painful

*If you think you are having chest pain and is not sure if it is muscle related or if you are having a heart attack please go to emergency room and/or check in with your medical doctor

If your symptoms are related more to pec major or pec minor here are some things to do.

  • Rest would be very important since these muscle do so much work
  • Icing the area a few times a day for 15-20 minutes at each session
  • Some sort of anti-inflammatory to control the inflammation
  • Treatment at our office would be with Low Level Light Therapy, chiropractic adjustments, physical therapy for stretching and to start implementing an exercises routine. Massage therapy to try and relax the tight and aggravated muscles. As well as a posture program to make sure the correct muscles are working properly

Mention this blog to receive your New Patient exam for only $55!! Call today at 847-362-4476

Muscle of the Month : IT Band

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC
Now that running season is upon us, it is that time again where our local runners are flocking in the door to get treatment on their legs. The infamous Iliotibial band (IT Band) is working overtime and it needs some help!!

What is iliotibial band (IT band) syndrome?

Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS or IT Band Syndrome) is an overuse injury of the connective tissues that are located on the lateral or outer part of thigh and knee. It causes pain and tenderness in those areas, especially just above the knee joint.  Iliotibial band syndrome is the most common cause of lateral knee pain in runners and bicyclists.

How Does This Muscle Work?

The iliotibial tract is classified as a deep fascia of the body, surrounding and connecting the muscles of the body to surrounding tissues. Like all other deep fascia, it is made almost exclusively of dense regular connective tissue. Dense regular connective tissue is a form of fibrous connective tissue that is extremely strong, tough, and avascular. It is made almost exclusively of collagen fibers and fibroblast cells, which produce collagen. Collagen is the strongest protein found in nature and is one of the strongest structures in the entire human body. The collagen fibers are arranged in a regular pattern of straight lines, giving the iliotibial tract incredible strength in the direction in which muscle force is applied to it and considerably less strength in other directions.

Functionally, the iliotibial tract extends the tensor fascia latae muscle into the lower thigh and leg, allowing it to function as an abductor, medial rotator and flexor of the thigh. It also allows the tensor fascia latae and gluteus maximus muscles to support the extension of the knee while standing, walking, running and biking.

What Can Cause IT Band Symptoms?

Iliotibial band inflammation is an overuse syndrome that occurs most often in long-distance runners, bicyclists, and other athletes who repeatedly squat. The iliotibial band syndrome may be the result of a combination of issues, including poor training habits, poor flexibility of muscle, and other mechanical imbalances in the body, especially involving the low back, pelvis, hips, and knees

What Can I do to treat the IT band??

Treatment can get started as soon as you notice any discomfort.

  1. Icing the area for up to 20 minutes a day a few times a day can help decrease the inflammation.
  2. Using either a Foam Roller, Tiger Tail, or lacrosse ball to work on getting those collagen fibers to relax.   You will want to focus on all muscles of the lower body as most times IT Band Syndrome is caused from issues which stem from the Glutes and hip flexors.  Using any one of these items may not be comfortable in the beginning of treatment and it will take some time to get used to. Over time, the discomfort will go away.
  1. It is important to have regular adjustments to make sure that the low back and hips are in alignment.  
  2. Manual therapy performed such as Graston or working with one of our massage therapists may break up tissue adhesions restricting the bodies ability to heal.
  3. Stretches and specific exercises can be added to your routine at home taught by one our licensed athletic trainers.

If you are not sure if you have IT band syndrome, just give us a call at 847-362-4476 and we can get you ready for the 2017 running season. If you mention this blog you also can get either the Foam roller or Tiger Tail for 15% off!!

The Trapezius : Muscle of the Month

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

The trapezius is one of the major muscles of the back and is responsible for moving, rotating, and stabilizing the scapula (shoulder blade) and extending the head at the neck. It is a wide, flat, superficial muscle that covers most of the upper back and the posterior of the neck. Like most other muscles, there are two trapezius muscles – a left and a right trapezius – that are symmetrical and meet at the vertebral column

The trapezius starts at the occipital bone and the spinous processes of the cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Then extends across the neck and back to insert via tendons on the clavicle, acromion, and spine of the scapula. The name trapezius is given to this muscle due to its roughly trapezoidal shape. The trapezius can be divided into three bands of muscle fibers that have distinct structures and functions within the muscle:

Upper Trapezius, Middle Trapezius and Lower Trapezius

 Upper Trapezius

This portion helps with elevating (shrugging) the scapula or by bracing the shoulder when weight is carried; ie purses, grocery bags, backpacks, laptop bags. The action of this muscle also helps to extend the neck. Symptoms of having issues with the upper trapezius muscle are; headaches, facial/temple/jaw pain, pain behind the eye, dizziness, stiffness and limited range of motion

Middle Trapezius

These muscle fibers help to retract and adduct the scapula by pulling the shoulder blade closer to the spine. Symptoms can be mid back pain, headaches at the base of the sku
ll, a “burning” sensation that is close to the spine, and pain referring to the shoulder

Lower Trapezius

The inferior fibers depress the scapula by pulling it closer to the lower part of the thoracic vertebrae. To rotate the scapula, the lower and upper fibers work together to  rotate the shoulder blade upward. All three sections help to stabilize the shoulder blade to prevent irrelevant movement. Symptoms can be mid-back, neck, and/or upper shoulder region pain, possibly referral pain on the back of the shoulder blade, down the inside of the arm, and into the ring and little fingers, a deep ache and tenderness over the top of the shoulder

 

Causes of Trapezius Symptoms

  • a purse or daypack that is too heavy and on just one shoulder
  • fatigue
  • tensing your shoulders
  • cradling a phone between your ear and shoulder
  • a chair without armrests, or the armrests are too high
  • typing with a keyboard too high
  • sleeping on your front or back with your head rotated to the side for a long period
  • sitting without a firm back support (sitting slumped)
  • Backpacking, bike riding
  • any profession or activity that requires you to bend over for extended periods
  • large breasts and not wearing a supportive bra
  • whiplash (a car accident, falling on your head, or any sudden jerk of the head)
  • head-forward posture
  • turning your head to one side for long periods to have a conversation
  • tight pectoralis major muscles

 

Treatment

Treatment to help reduce the pain in any of these three sections of the trapezius is thru physical therapy to increase range of motion and to help strengthen the neck. Also thru chiropractic care to make sure there are no subluxations and that the body is in proper alignment. Massage therapy will help relax the muscles from spasming and also using Low Level Light Therapy (Cold Laser) to reduce any inflammation that is being caused in the body.

If you are not sure if you are experiencing any of these symptoms mentioned above and is not sure what to do we are offering a free consultation with one of our doctors to see if we can help. Please call the office at 847-362-4476 so we can help you to start feeling better today!

What Is Cupping Therapy and What Can It Do For You?

by Karith King

Cupping is a unique treatment that uses suction to lift tissue as a cup is moved by the therapist to decompress the underlying tissue. It combines various massage and stretching techniques with the application of a slightly pressurized cup. This helps to lift and separate the soft tissue, allowing for greater fluid movement and nutrient supply throughout the soft tissues. This nourishes, detoxifies, stimulates and increases range of motion. The cups come in various sizes depending on the treatment area needed.

Though it was recently made famous during the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics when the cupping marks (circular bruises) were visible all over swimmer Michael Phelps, cupping has actually been around for a very long time. Cupping is an ancient medical treatment; its Chinese roots date back to 300 or 400 A.D. Egyptian and Middle Eastern cultures also have ancient records of the practice. Cupping is still regularly used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in Chinese hospitals and elsewhere.

Cupping creates a negative (tension) pressure which:

      Passively stretches tissue resulting in increased ROM.

      Increases blood supply/heat to area treated.

      Increases fluid movement, which assists in recovery.

      Increases nutrient-rich blood supply to injured area.

People seek cupping therapy for many purposes, including pain management, to reduce inflammation, improve circulation and digestion, to promote relaxation and well-being, and as a type of deep-tissue massage.  Don’t be turned off by those ‘bruises!’ They are often the sign of a successful treatment and will disappear within two days to two weeks!

Cupping can help improve several medical conditions including:

  Poor circulation

  Sciatica

  Low back pain

  Chronic pain

  Arthritis

  Muscular Aches

  Bursitis

  Tendonitis

  Scars and Adhesions

  Trigger Points (knots)

  Tension Headaches

  Sinusitis

  Pre & Post-Operative Conditions

  Athletic Stress & Injury

  Plantar Fasciitis

  Myofascial Pain Syndrome

  Scoliosis

  Fibromyalgia

Are you interested in experiencing cupping for yourself?  We recommend an initial massage with Karith so she can learn your tissues to better understand where you could benefit from cupping.  Following that initial massage at regular price you can recieve your first cupping session for *FREE (with the purchase of follow-up massage).  If you are a current client of Karith’s, add on cupping to your next massage session for FREE.  Mention this blog for discount!

Muscle of the Month : The Piriformis

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

When patients come into our office with low back pain or symptoms resembling sciatica one of the muscles we check in on is the piriformis. During the examination we will check on range of motion and strength of different muscles to see if we can narrow down where the pain/discomfort is coming from. It is usually not just one muscle that is tight or restricting but the piriformis is tight in most if not all in our patients.

The piriformis  is a flat, pyramid-shaped muscle that lies parallel to (in line with) the gluteus medius and underneath the gluteus maximus muscle in the hip area.The muscle passes through the greater sciatic foramen (a space in the pelvic bones, on each side of the center) and to the upper part of the greater trochanter (a bone ridge near the top of the femur, or thigh bone). It takes up the most area in the greater sciatic foramen.

It is a small muscle when compared to other muscles of the region. The piriformis helps rotate the hip and works with other rotators. It will rotate the thigh while extended and will abduct, or pull inward, the thigh when flexed.

The close nature of the piriformis muscle to the sciatic nerve, which is the largest nerve in the human body, can cause pain in some individuals. This known as piriformis syndrome.  This pain can run from the buttocks to the lower back and in some cases down the leg into the ankle. The more joints the nerve passes thru with pain the longer the recovery. This condition can happen to anyone and can worsen with prolonged sitting, sedentary lifestyle, other muscles not working or “firing” correctly and if the problem is not addressed as soon as possible.

Treatment to help reduce the pain in the piriformis

  • Physical therapy to increase range of motion and to help strengthen the low back, core etc.
  • Chiropractic care to make sure there are no subluxations and that the body is in proper alignment.
  • Massage therapy to help relax the muscles from spasming
  • Low Level Light Therapy (Cold Laser) to reduce any inflammation that is being caused in the body.

Pictured below is a great stretch to help loosen the piriformis.  For more information on how to stretch, visit here.

If you are not sure if you are experiencing any of these symptoms mentioned above and are not sure what to do we are offering a free consultation with one of our doctors to see if we can help. Please call the office at 847-362-4476 so we can stop it in its tracks!!

 

Why You Should Foam Roll

by Dr. Jade Dellinger

Why Should You Use a Foam Roller?

This is one of the many questions we get asked during our rehab time with patients. Many people do not know what a foam roller is and how it will even help them. They think it is just another one of our torture devices we use on people.

Self-myofascial release is a fancy term for self-massage to release muscle tightness or trigger points. This is something you can do at home without having to come into the office. This method can be performed with a foam roller, lacrosse ball, Theracane, or your own hands. By applying pressure to specific points on your body you are able to aid in the recovery of muscles and assist in returning them to normal function. Normal function means your muscles are elastic, healthy, and ready to perform at a moment’s notice.

This can have a wide range of benefits for the everyday gym-goer or someone who who works out at home. Benefits of using the foam roller will be increased blood flow throughout the body, better movement and increased range of motion. These benefits can decrease the chance of injury and decrease recovery time after a workout. A decreased recovery time means more training sessions per week/month and results can come quicker. Increased circulation is huge for recovery and to improve greater range of motion.

This can be done before or after a workout is performed. In the beginning the areas you use the foam roller will have some discomfort but the more you work on it the muscles will loosen up and your body will get used to it. There is no wrong way to use the foam roller except if you are using improper form. So if you are not sure don’t be afraid to ask because we would rather have you ask us questions then go home and aggravate the muscle.  Important areas to foam roll are all of them!!! From your calves to your middle back then foam roller can be used to work out those knots.  Here are some ways to use a foam roller.

So the next time you see a foam roller don’t be afraid of it!! Embrace it and it will be your new best friend!!

 

What is a Trigger Point?

by Kristin Stromberg, ATC

What are these knots in my back and neck?? Are these normal? How do I get rid of them? This is a very popular question that we get asked here in the office at North Shore Pro-Active Health. Before we answer the question above let us talk about how muscle fibers work. Within skeletal muscle there are three types of fiber. Type one (I), type two A (IIa) and type two B (IIb). Each fiber types has different qualities in the way they perform and how quickly they fatigue.

Types of Trigger Points

Type I fibers are also known as slow twitch fibers. They are red in color due to the presence of large volumes of myoglobin (iron-oxygen binding protein) and high numbers of Mitochondria (power house of the cell). They are very resistant to fatigue and are capable of producing repeated low-level contractions by producing large amounts of ATP (Adenosine triphosphate) through an aerobic metabolic cycle. The muscles containing mainly type I fibers are often postural muscles such as those in the neck and spine due to their endurance capabilities.

Type IIa fibers are also sometimes known as fast oxidative fibres and are a hybrid of type I and II fibers. These fibers contain a large number of mitochondria and Myoglobin, hence their red colour. They manufacture and split ATP at a fast rate by utilising both aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and so produce fast, strong muscle contractions, although they are more prone to fatigue than type I fibers.

Type IIb often known as fast glycolytic fibers they are white in colour due to a low level of myoglobin and also contain few mitochondria. They produce ATP at a slow rate by anaerobic metabolism and break it down very quickly. This results in short, fast bursts of power and rapid fatigue. As mentioned above, this type of fiber can be turned into type IIa fibers by resistance training. This is a positive change due to the increased fatigue resistance of type IIa fibers. These fibers are found in large quantities in the muscles of the arms.

Muscles make up between 36-42% of body weight, on average. They are a large percentage of our total weight and have a corresponding impact on our health. When all is in working order, muscles allow us to perform normal activities with ease. When our muscles harbor trigger points, we experience pain, stiffness and tension, physical limitation and loss of normal function.

Factors commonly cited as predisposing to trigger point formation include but are not limited to: de-conditioning, poor posture, repetitive mechanical stress, mechanical imbalance (e.g. leg length inequality), joint disorders, non-restorative sleep, vitamin deficiencies, muscle clenching and tensing due to emotional/mental stress, direct injury or being inactive for long periods of time such as sitting or bed rest.

Active Trigger Points versus Dormant Trigger Points

After forming, trigger points have two phases, active and dormant. The active, painful phase of the trigger point is the one which produces the unrelenting, debilitating pain symptoms and which motivates people to seek relief. The active trigger point hurts when pressed with a finger and causes pain around it and in other areas. It causes the muscle in which it’s located to be weak and due to the taut bands, to have limited flexibility. The active trigger point referral symptom may feel like a dull ache, deep, pressing pain, burning, or a sensation of numbness and fatigue. The affected dense, shortened muscles, laden with taut bands may even compress and entrap nerves, leading to another secondary set of symptoms. If unaddressed or ineffectively treated, eventually, other muscles around the dysfunctional one may be required to “take up the slack”, becoming stressed and developing secondary trigger points. It is not unusual for chronic pain patients to have multiple, overlapping referred pain patterns, making diagnosis and treatment more complex.

Trigger points can also lie quietly in muscles, sometimes for years. This type of trigger point is called dormant or in-active. These trigger points are very common. Unless you press on the trigger point and feel the tenderness, you probably don’t know they are there. Most people have at least a few. They may persist for years after apparent recovery from injury. Dormant trigger points cause; restricted movement, distorted muscle movement patterns, stiffness and weakness of the affected muscle and generally do not cause pain unless compressed.

How Many Trigger Points Can I Have?

Since a trigger point is an abnormal biochemical and mechanical area in contracted muscle tissue, the number and exact location on each person can vary.  All muscle tissue is potentially prone to developing trigger points. Sometimes people have one trigger point but more often they have many. Prolonged referral of pain and weakness from a one trigger point to another area of the body will generally cause other trigger points to develop in that area. These, in turn, if left untreated, can activate and also refer pain, creating multiple pain patterns. The more areas that have pain and the longer you have had the pain, the more trigger points you are likely to have. It is rare for someone with pain to only have one or two muscles with trigger points.

What Can I Do For My Trigger Points?

Here at North Shore Pro-Active Health we see patients every day that deal with some sort of trigger point issue. Whether it is in their neck, low back, forearm, calf or hamstrings there are ways to help reduce the symptoms of pain and correct the muscles so they do not come back again. A few tools we use in the office are foam rollers, lacrosse balls and Tiger Tails. These are items that can be used at home on a daily basis or if there is going to be a lot of travel and then the patient can do self care. We also encourage trigger point release massage with our massage therapist. The length of time can be from 60 minutes to 90 minutes depending on how severe the pain is for the patient.

If you have any questions or concerns please call the office at 847-362-4476 for a free consultation and also mention this blog to receive 15% off either a Tiger Tail or Foam roller!

Massage Contraindications

by Dr. Jordan Leasure

Massage therapy is therapeutic in many ways. Massage increases blood and lymph flow which aids in healing and decreases the stress hormone called cortisol. In most circumstances massage can help to improve your health. However,there are times that massage is not recommended.  Below is a list of reasons massage may be contraindicated. If anything on this list pertains to you, please talk to your massage therapist before booking a massage.

  • Fever
  • Contagious illness or disease (including a cold or flu)
  • If you are taking any pain medication
  • Recent operations or acute injuries
  • Skin diseases
  • First trimester of pregnancy

Only when cleared by your physician:

  • High blood pressure or cardio-vascular conditions
  • Edema
  • Osteoporosis
  • Cancer
  • Epilepsy
  • Diabetes
  • Bell’s palsy

For more questions on anything on or not on this list, please contact our office and we will be happy to assist if scheduling a massage is appropriate for you.

Massage Therapist Qualifications

by Dr. Jordan Leasure

Did you know massage therapists in Illinois need 750 hours of learning and training to qualify for licensing?  A typical curriculum would consist of Anatomy 1 and 2, Pathology, Physiology,  Kinesiology, Palpation, Clinical integration, Ethics, Hydrotherapy, and Alternative complimentary therapies.

A skilled massage therapist should know how to assess range of motion for all joints, assess your gate and posture upon viewing, utilize Orthopedic testing if necessary, assess your information from your intake form, and talk to you about your concerns.

After doing these these things, the massage therapists should be able to use their knowledge of anatomy and massage therapy to devise a plan for treating you that day. Usually our goal is to find the source of your pain and eradicate it through various massage techniques and modalities.

Sometimes the therapist may check for pain or abnormalities in areas other than where you are experiencing localized pain because often times the source of the problem is not always where the patient is feeling pain.

After your massage we take medical notes and add to the Dr.’s notes our findings so that the information is there for our other massage therapists and Dr.’s to see.

All the massage therapists at NSPAH are licensed by the state of Illinois, which means we all have the training stated above and we are all committed to helping our patients obtain optimal health and be pain free!